dead things

Questions   Submissions   I appreciate the beauty in dead things.

Note: if you are not comfortable, or you disagree with any of these things, don't look or comment. This blog isn't about fashion, or looking "cool", it's about appreciating the animal, even though it is now deceased - which different people do through different ways, be it skulls, pelts, soft mounts or headdresses.

Disclaimer: unless tagged "mine" none of the animals posted are mine.

|#//#| My dead things diary |#//#|

shadyufo:

The rabbit bones I found the other day. They’re macerating right now.

shadyufo:

The rabbit bones I found the other day. They’re macerating right now.

— 5 hours ago with 92 notes
#bones 
malformalady:

This calf skull is an acquisition of the Museum of Osteology. Based on their initial analysis, it appears to have suffered from a split palate, and had no brain cavity.

malformalady:

This calf skull is an acquisition of the Museum of Osteology. Based on their initial analysis, it appears to have suffered from a split palate, and had no brain cavity.

(via thepottersfield)

— 7 hours ago with 960 notes
#domestic  #skull  #deformity 
malformalady:

A horse skull with a dental cut-away. A horse’s incisors, premolars, and molars continue to grow as the grinding surface is worn down through chewing.

malformalady:

A horse skull with a dental cut-away. A horse’s incisors, premolars, and molars continue to grow as the grinding surface is worn down through chewing.

(via howtoskinatiger)

— 9 hours ago with 502 notes
#skull  #domestic  #teeth 

thegreenwolf:

All That Remains: A Haunting Gallery of Extinct Animals in Paris

La Salle des Espèces Menacées et des Espèces Disparues, or the Room of Endangered and Extinct Species, has 257 specimens from the animal and plant kingdoms. Many are the only remaining examples of their species, such as the skeleton of a black emu (the taxidermy is so precious that it is kept in storage). Others represent a species that is on the brink of obliteration, including the Sumatran tiger. 

Read more here.

— 11 hours ago with 1878 notes
#museum  #extinct  #taxidermy 
thewandw:

Muntjac skulls now online! Not CITES listed so can be shipped worldwide. Find them and more at www.theweirdandwonderful.com

thewandw:

Muntjac skulls now online! Not CITES listed so can be shipped worldwide. Find them and more at www.theweirdandwonderful.com

— 13 hours ago with 26 notes
#wishlist  #UK  #for sale  #skull  #deer 
gennacrowe:

cleaned up my mummified opossum pal

gennacrowe:

cleaned up my mummified opossum pal

(via blackbackedjackal)

— 15 hours ago with 59 notes
#skull 
grunerdermy:

FOR SALE!
I am going away for a week during August to visit family in New Hampshire and to see what condition my cats are in (one has a large tumor on her belly and no one is willing to do anything about it, I’m hoping to get her to the vet for an exam and to figure out how much it will cost to remove it) and will need a little extra cash.
I still have this female red fox skeleton, packed and ready to ship, available for $75 shipped (United States only).
I also have a coyote wall pedastal form (4” x 14” right turn) with eyes and ear liners available for $65 plus shipping.
You can email me at dmritten@gmail.com if interested. Please include whatever you are interested in in the subject line, or it may get deleted.
Thanks.

grunerdermy:

FOR SALE!

I am going away for a week during August to visit family in New Hampshire and to see what condition my cats are in (one has a large tumor on her belly and no one is willing to do anything about it, I’m hoping to get her to the vet for an exam and to figure out how much it will cost to remove it) and will need a little extra cash.

I still have this female red fox skeleton, packed and ready to ship, available for $75 shipped (United States only).

I also have a coyote wall pedastal form (4” x 14” right turn) with eyes and ear liners available for $65 plus shipping.

You can email me at dmritten@gmail.com if interested. Please include whatever you are interested in in the subject line, or it may get deleted.

Thanks.

— 1 day ago with 14 notes
#canine  #skeleton  #vulpes  #bones  #for sale  #US 

theolduvaigorge:

Academy of Sciences display: Skulls tell life stories

  • by Julian Guthrie

Ray Bandar was 26 years old in 1953 when he found his first dead harbor seal at San Francisco’s Ocean Beach. He ended up bringing the head of the seal home on the bus and cleaning it in one of his mom’s pots. Next, he found the remains of a young female California sea lion. This time, after doing the decapitation, he buried the skull in his back yard and let bugs do the cleaning.

More than a half-century later, Bandar - “just call me Bones,” he says - is 87 and has one of the world’s largest private collections of animal skulls. Bandar’s bones make up nearly all of the 640 different skulls and skeletons on display in one of the California Academy of Sciences' latest exhibits, “Skulls.”

"I have an appreciation for art, and I started to look at bones as pieces of sculpture," Bandar said, sitting in front of the exhibit’s signature piece, "A Sea of Sea Lions,” a 90-foot-long wall with more than 400 California sea lion skulls - the largest such collection in the world.

The skulls on display in the Academy’s 4,000-square-foot second-floor Forum Theater and Gallery range from an enormous African bull elephant to a tiny bat, from frogs and fish to giraffes and walruses. There are interactive displays that simulate the vision of predator and prey, and allow visitors to be hands-on with cast skulls. Another part of the exhibit shows live dermestid beetle larvae cleaning delicate bones (the larvae can scour the flesh of a small skull in three days). And there is an interactive 3-D display developed by Google that allows visitors to view skulls from various angles.

"A skull provides important information about a species’ evolution and reveals secrets about that individual animal’s life," said Moe Flannery, collections manager of ornithology and mammalogy at the academy. Walking through the exhibit, Flannery added, “By searching for clues written in the bone, we can follow the story of an animal’s life, from birth to old age. We can learn what the animal ate, how it defended itself, communicated, interacted with its environment, and often how it died - all by looking at its skull.”

The exhibit begins with the massive African bull elephant skull, which belonged to a member of the largest living species of land mammal. At 218 pounds, the skull is relatively light because of the honeycomb-like spaces in its forehead, allowing the animal to hold its head up” (read more).

(Source: SF Gate )

(via blackbackedjackal)

— 1 day ago with 433 notes
#museum  #skulls  #interesting 

thebrainscoop:

Happy Birthday, Walter Potter!

Walter Potter (2 July 1835 – 21 May 1918) was a Victorian taxidermist most famous for his eccentric anthropomorphic taxidermy. He received fame and accolades for such lovely scenes as “The Kittens’ Wedding” (his final creation in 1890), and his Rabbit School. Potter first began exploring the recreation of nursery rhymes using preserved and costumed animals in 1854 at the age of 19, and completed his most famous work, “The Death and Burial of Cock Robin,” which included 96 species of British birds. 

With encouragement and support from his local community, Potter was able to earn a living and support his family at an Inn in Bramber, a small town in West Sussex. Locals commissioned Walter to preserve their pets and he relied on donations of dead animals to populate his fanciful scenes. The clothes were created by his neighbors and his daughter Minnie. 

Many of Potter’s works remained on display at the Bramber Inn, which was turned into a Museum during his life in order to house more than 10,000 specimens. The original Museum eventually closed in the 1970s and moved to Cornwall in 1984, before being sold and disbanded in 2003. 

Sources: 
Telegraph UK
Walter Potter’s Curious World of Taxidermy by Dr. Pat Morris
Walter Potter Taxidermy

— 1 day ago with 2081 notes
#taxidermy